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Baker Street Underground station. London, Great Britain, 2016.

Baker Street Underground station. London, UK, 2016. Get a print.

Baker Street is not only known for the 221B, house of the famous Sherlock Holmes! It also hosts a fantastic underground station. I found this during a short business trip I recently did in London. This tube station opened in 1863, as one of the stop of the very first lines. It has since been extended with 3 additional lines. Because of that, its layout is quite complex, mixing different architecture styles across the platforms. While I was looking for this particular platform, I started by the newest one, getting back in time the further I progressed. Interesting trip in time, really 🙂

The older platform, pictured here, hosts the Hammersmith and City Line, one of the 2 first lines that opened in 1863. It represents quite well the Victorian architecture that was en vogue then. The pseudo arches with white tiles mimic the light from the outside. Pretty interesting! It’s really a fantastic place that deserves a visit! It was already quite late in the evening, so the platform was not too full. I noticed this well dressed woman, I rushed to place myself so that I can frame her between two men, the one sitting, and the one on the poster. An almost perfect symmetry! Once again, I love to mix architecture, geometry and people in my urban photography, and this photo does is pretty well I think. I hope you enjoy it !

Please also note that no saxophones were hurt while taking this photo 😉 However I have been having Gerry Rafferty’s song in my head for the past week!

Do you like this photo? Why not getting an original, signed fine art print in limited edition?

EXIFs:

  • Camera:Fujifilm X100T
  • Aperture: ƒ/4.0
  • Focale: 23mm
  • Shutter speed: 1/60s
  • ISO: 3200
  • Copyright: Pierre Pichot 2016, all rights reserved

Szent Gellert Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

Szent Gellert Ter station. Get a print!

The M4 line is the newest metro line opened in Budapest, Hungary. Also known as the Green Line, it has opened in March 2014. The first section is 10 stations long, from the North-East of the city to the South-West, having to go under the Danube.

The most interesting about this metro line remains the impressive architecture of the stations. As the line goes under the Danube, the stations have been constructed quite deep in the ground, and interesting architectural solution have been found.

Find more about my journey around 3 impressive metro stations in Budapest represented with no less than 14 photos by checking my new Photo Essay: Budapest Metro stations!

Also, give a look to the collection of all my Photo Essays.

Budapest metro stations


The M4 line is the newest metro line opened in Budapest, Hungary. Also known as the Green Line, it has opened in March 2014. The first section is 10 stations long, from the North-East of the city to the South-West, having to go under the Danube.

The most interesting about this metro line remains the impressive architecture of the stations. As the line goes under the Danube, the stations have been constructed quite deep in the ground, and interesting architectural solution have been found.

Fővám Tér station

The Fővám Tér station is where I’ve started my trip beneath Budapest. I must admit I remained quite in shock when I saw this great architecture under the city. Electric stairs take you way underneath the ground, with a complex mix of lines via beams and girders.

Fovam Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

First view when entering Fővám Tér. Get a print.

Fovam Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

Down the electric stairs. Impressive architecture!

Fovam Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

The platform in itself, sticking to the overall style.

Fovam Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

Train entering the station.

Next stop: Szent Gellért Tér station.

Szent Gellért tér station

Second stop of my trip, the Szent Gellért Tér station is situated on the Buda side of the Danube. It is also the deepest station on the M4 line. It looks like Fővám Tér: same global architecture, same long electric stairs to come down but… with a twist 😉

Szent Gellert Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

A twisty tiles pattern

Szent Gellert Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

Waiting for the next train to come.

Szent Gellert Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

A similar approach for reaching the platform.

Szent Gellert Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

Escaping the eye of the storm.

Szent Gellert Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

En route for my last stop…

Kálvin tér

Last stop for me, and unlike the two previous stations, the Kálvin tér is not (totally) a new station. The newest part on the M4 stick to a more modern look, but now with its own style. The platform is way higher, with rounder forms instead of the strict lines of the two other stations. However, when you quit this grey cathedral, a colourful corridor takes you to the older M3 platform, which brings us back to a more communist style.

Kalvin Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

Architectural changes… but no less impressive! Get a print!

Kalvin Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

From M4 to M3, less grey, more yellow.

Kalvin Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

We leave the modern lines…

Kalvin Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

…and come back to the older way of doing things.

This way an incredible journey. Even if it was quite a short trip between 3 metro stations, it has been a real treat for my eyes, and my camera. I know that during my next trip to Budapest, I’ll be back there.

As always, all the photos in this essay are available as signed, limited edition prints with certificate of authenticity, printed on high quality Hahnemühle paper. Go to the shop, or contact me for a quote!

Bucharest Underground. Bucharest, Romania, 2016.

Bucharest Underground. Bucharest, Romania, 2016.

It’s been a while I haven’t spent a little bit of time in Bucharest. I’ve lived there for almost a year, but since I’ve left 9 years ago I’ve concentrated my visits to the concert halls, the French Embassy or the airport. Mot much of a visit! But this time, as I was invited as special guest by the On Spot street photography group, I managed to take a little more time to wander in Bucharest’s older quarter, and much more, in its metro.

As for Airports, I love shooting in the metro. For the same reasons I think: lines, contrast, movement… There is something else that airports don’t have: the proximity. No large spaces here, you are close to the people. You are next to them, no matter what. Which is not necessary a bad thing. Isn’t it Robert Capa who said: “If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough” ? So you get the graphical environment of the airports at a smaller, closer scale. Not bad 🙂

This particular photo isn’t a close shot, it’s true. I was first attracted by the floor and its contrasty lines and shapes, which continue on the metro’s wagon. I got my fair amount of line with the vertical pillars and the other metro on the other side of the station. But what makes this photo is the look of the man. In my first shots, which were framed a bit better I must say, he wasn’t looking at me. But when he looked at my side with his bored face, I know it would be the keeper shot, even if I’ve just changed my position. Bored people are the best!

Do you like this photo? Click here and get an original, signed print in limited edition!

EXIFs:

  • Camera:Fujifilm X100T
  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Focale: 23mm
  • Shutter speed: 1/250s
  • ISO: 6400
  • Copyright: Pierre Pichot 2016, all rights reserved

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