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Château de Portes

Château de Portes, France, 2020.

The Portes Castle (Château de Portes), situated in the Cévennes in the south of France, is a beautiful medieval castle built during the 12ve century. It has seen and survived quite a lot of events during the last 700+ years, until being almost destroyed in 1929 when the ground broke down due to the intensive exploitation of the mountains for coil. It has been restored in the last quarter of the 20th century to become classified as an historical monument.

I really like to visit old medieval castles like the Château de Portes. The history behind them, their architecture, the stones (pierre in french, my first name !)… they have an aura like no other monuments. They also offer a great photographic scene. The big windows spilling the light, reflecting on the ground and the walls of stones. I just love it, don’t you?

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The girl and the Lighthouse. Presqu'île de Guérande, France, 2019.

The girl and the lighthouse. Presqu’île de Guérande, France, 2019. Get a print!

I’ve spent the last week-end on the Guérande peninsula in the south of Brittany, France. I’m not really the landscape type, but it’s a good thing to do different or new stuff, even more when it can bring some money 😀

My target was this lighthouse in Le Croisic, with the scope of going for a long exposure shot to get those silky water and moving sky effects. But she (and then her boyfriend) passed by me and my tripod mounted camera, and sat just there. Well, if you want to be in my frame, I’ll go for it!

The photo was shot at 200mm at f/2.8 for a great blurry depth of field effect. It has caused some reactions

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Inside the Initiation Well at Quita da Regaleira (Sintra, Portugal).

Inside the Initiation Well at Quinta da Regaleira (Sintra, Portugal, 2017). Get a print!

The Initiation Well at Quinta da Regaleira (Sintra, Portugal) has been shot numerous times. I must admit its photogenic potential is absolutely over the top. The hardest was to take it from another angle, try something different. I got lucky to have the unintended help from a tourist that had the marvellous idea to pop his head out of the shadow at the exact right spot where the light was falling from the top of the well down to the bottom, 27 meters below. Thanks a lot sir, you made my day there 😉

The wells at Quinta da Regaleira were used for ceremonial purposes that included Tarot initiation rites. Some tunnels connect the different wells and caves via several underground paths… pretty interesting!

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More about The Initiation

For me, it’s important to share as much info as possible about the photos I take. Therefore, here are the EXIFs for this photo:

  • Camera: Canon 6D
  • Lens:Canon EF24-70mm f/2.8L II USM
  • Aperture: ƒ/2.8
  • Focale: 24mm
  • Shutter speed: 1/320s
  • ISO: 6400
  • Copyright: Pierre Pichot 2017, all rights reserved

Szent Gellert Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

Szent Gellert Ter station. Get a print!

The M4 line is the newest metro line opened in Budapest, Hungary. Also known as the Green Line, it has opened in March 2014. The first section is 10 stations long, from the North-East of the city to the South-West, having to go under the Danube.

The most interesting about this metro line remains the impressive architecture of the stations. As the line goes under the Danube, the stations have been constructed quite deep in the ground, and interesting architectural solution have been found.

Find more about my journey around 3 impressive metro stations in Budapest represented with no less than 14 photos by checking my new Photo Essay: Budapest Metro stations!

Also, give a look to the collection of all my Photo Essays.

Budapest metro stations


The M4 line is the newest metro line opened in Budapest, Hungary. Also known as the Green Line, it has opened in March 2014. The first section is 10 stations long, from the North-East of the city to the South-West, having to go under the Danube.

The most interesting about this metro line remains the impressive architecture of the stations. As the line goes under the Danube, the stations have been constructed quite deep in the ground, and interesting architectural solution have been found.

Fővám Tér station

The Fővám Tér station is where I’ve started my trip beneath Budapest. I must admit I remained quite in shock when I saw this great architecture under the city. Electric stairs take you way underneath the ground, with a complex mix of lines via beams and girders.

Fovam Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

First view when entering Fővám Tér. Get a print.

Fovam Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

Down the electric stairs. Impressive architecture!

Fovam Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

The platform in itself, sticking to the overall style.

Fovam Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

Train entering the station.

Next stop: Szent Gellért Tér station.

Szent Gellért tér station

Second stop of my trip, the Szent Gellért Tér station is situated on the Buda side of the Danube. It is also the deepest station on the M4 line. It looks like Fővám Tér: same global architecture, same long electric stairs to come down but… with a twist 😉

Szent Gellert Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

A twisty tiles pattern

Szent Gellert Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

Waiting for the next train to come.

Szent Gellert Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

A similar approach for reaching the platform.

Szent Gellert Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

Escaping the eye of the storm.

Szent Gellert Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

En route for my last stop…

Kálvin tér

Last stop for me, and unlike the two previous stations, the Kálvin tér is not (totally) a new station. The newest part on the M4 stick to a more modern look, but now with its own style. The platform is way higher, with rounder forms instead of the strict lines of the two other stations. However, when you quit this grey cathedral, a colourful corridor takes you to the older M3 platform, which brings us back to a more communist style.

Kalvin Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

Architectural changes… but no less impressive! Get a print!

Kalvin Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

From M4 to M3, less grey, more yellow.

Kalvin Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

We leave the modern lines…

Kalvin Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

…and come back to the older way of doing things.

This way an incredible journey. Even if it was quite a short trip between 3 metro stations, it has been a real treat for my eyes, and my camera. I know that during my next trip to Budapest, I’ll be back there.

As always, all the photos in this essay are available as signed, limited edition prints with certificate of authenticity, printed on high quality Hahnemühle paper. Go to the shop, or contact me for a quote!

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