Budapest metro stations

The M4 line is the newest metro line opened in Budapest, Hungary. Also known as the Green Line, it has opened in March 2014. The first section is 10 stations long, from the North-East of the city to the South-West, having to go under the Danube.

The most interesting about this metro line remains the impressive architecture of the stations. As the line goes under the Danube, the stations have been constructed quite deep in the ground, and interesting architectural solution have been found.

Fővám Tér station

The Fővám Tér station is where I’ve started my trip beneath Budapest. I must admit I remained quite in shock when I saw this great architecture under the city. Electric stairs take you way underneath the ground, with a complex mix of lines via beams and girders.

Fovam Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

First view when entering Fővám Tér. Get a print.

Fovam Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

Down the electric stairs. Impressive architecture!

Fovam Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

The platform in itself, sticking to the overall style.

Fovam Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

Train entering the station.

Next stop: Szent Gellért Tér station.

Szent Gellért tér station

Second stop of my trip, the Szent Gellért Tér station is situated on the Buda side of the Danube. It is also the deepest station on the M4 line. It looks like Fővám Tér: same global architecture, same long electric stairs to come down but… with a twist 😉

Szent Gellert Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

A twisty tiles pattern

Szent Gellert Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

Waiting for the next train to come.

Szent Gellert Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

A similar approach for reaching the platform.

Szent Gellert Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

Escaping the eye of the storm.

Szent Gellert Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

En route for my last stop…

Kálvin tér

Last stop for me, and unlike the two previous stations, the Kálvin tér is not (totally) a new station. The newest part on the M4 stick to a more modern look, but now with its own style. The platform is way higher, with rounder forms instead of the strict lines of the two other stations. However, when you quit this grey cathedral, a colourful corridor takes you to the older M3 platform, which brings us back to a more communist style.

Kalvin Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

Architectural changes… but no less impressive! Get a print!

Kalvin Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

From M4 to M3, less grey, more yellow.

Kalvin Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

We leave the modern lines…

Kalvin Ter station. Budapest, Hungary, 2016.

…and come back to the older way of doing things.

This way an incredible journey. Even if it was quite a short trip between 3 metro stations, it has been a real treat for my eyes, and my camera. I know that during my next trip to Budapest, I’ll be back there.

As always, all the photos in this essay are available as signed, limited edition prints with certificate of authenticity, printed on high quality Hahnemühle paper. Go to the shop, or contact me for a quote!

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